0974e Gwefan Cymru-Catalonia. A Gwentian Welsh dictionary (Welsh-English), with words and expressions from the south-eastern dialect of Welsh related to the standard Welsh forms, and the English meaning. Acha = ar uchaf (preposition). Meaning: on, on top of. Acha ceffl = on horseback. Cwato. Meaning: to hide. From dialect English quat = to hide.

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vortaro_gwenta_angla_GWENCI_a_0974e.htm

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Gwefan Cymru-Catalonia
La Web de Gal
les i Catalunya

Y Wenhwyseg (tafodiaith y de-ddwyrain)
Gwentian (the dialect of the south-east)


Y GEIRIADUR GWENHWYSEG
DICTIONARY OF GWENTIAN (South-eastern Welsh)



(1) In this (expanding, we hope) dictionary we list words and expressions from the south-eastern dialect of Welsh (Morgannwg and Gwent) and relate them to the standard Welsh forms, along with the English meaning.

For example,
acha = ar uchaf (preposition).
Meaning: on, on top of.
Acha ceffl = on horseback.

(2) We also list the standard Welsh form and the form it has in Gwentian.
ar uchaf (preposition) = on, on top of..
Not in general use in modern Welsh.
Common in Gwentian in the form acha (acha ceffl, on horseback).

(3) There is no standard spelling for Gwentian. Most dialect writers used an adapted standard Welsh spelling, and the result was fairly uniform.
We have tried a couple of innovations which I shall explain on another page pun fdd gen i dicn o amsar (when I have a bit of time!)



GEIRIADUR GWENHWYSEG

Cumulative number of entries:
15 07 2002 - 93 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
02 11 2001 - 90 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
15 12 2000 - 53 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
24 07 2000 - 43 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
04 07 2000 - 37 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references

26 06 2000 - 24 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
21 06 2000 - 19 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references
20 06 2000 - 14 o brifeiriau a chroesgyfeiriadau / headwords and cross-references


GYA = Geiriadur yr Acdemi Gymrig (Welsh Academy Dictionary)
GPC = Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru (Dictionary of the University of Wales)


______________________________________________
Aberaman [a-ber-a-man]
Gwentian:
Braman [bra-man]
Village in the Cynon valley (the confluence of Aman, place where the Aman stream flows into the river Cynon;
aber = confluence (used with the name of a tributary) + Aman (river name)
In Gwentian, Aberaman > Beraman > Braman
(1) the initial vowel, which is unaccented, drops away (a very common phenomenon in spoken Welsh)
(2) the vowel in the pretonic syllable drops away to give a consonant cluster br-
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Aberogwr [a-ber--gur]
Gwentian:
Brocwr [bro-kur]
Name of the the village at the estuary of this river (called by the English Ogmore on Sea).
In Gwentian, Aberogwr > Aberocwr > Berocwr > Brocwr
(1) In Gwentian, [b d g] as the initial syllable of the final syllable are devoiced to give [p t k]
(2) the initial vowel, which is unaccented, drops away (a very common phenomenon in spoken Welsh)
(3) the vowel in the pretonic syllable drops away to give a consonant cluster br-
______________________________________________
acha
See: ar uchaf (on, on top of)
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afradu [a-vra-di]
Gwentian:
bratu [bra-ti]
1 to waste, to use needlessly.
From afradu = to waste; af- = negative prefix, rhad = grace, -u = suffix to form verbs. Afradu > fradu. Because f [v] is often a soft-mutated form of b in some words there is a temptation to restore this b, even where it is unjustified. Hence fradu > bradu. In the south-east, a d- at the beginning of a final syllable is devoiced to t- (bratu).
______________________________________________
ala / hala
See: hala (to send)
______________________________________________
ar uchaf [ar--khav] (preposition)
Gwentian:
acha [a-kha]
1 on, on top of
ar + uchaf

on + (the) topmost (part) (of)
acha pen t = on the top of a house
Used only with indefinite nouns. With definite nouns ar is used.
Cf the preposition mewn = in (with indefinite nouns), yn (with definite nouns)
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bachan [b-khan] masculine noun
Gwentian:
bachan
MEANING: (1) fellow; (2) used also in addressing somebody; (3) in addressing somebody in disbelief at what has been asked or said, equivalent to an English expression of surprise followed by man, boy, my lad, my friend, etc Good heavens, man!
NOTE: Typically south-eastern, though it is found in other areas of Wales

-Beth yw reina? Bachan! Ond tortha Ffrengig yw reina!
(-Beth yw y rheina? -Bachan! Ond torthau Ffrengig ywr rheina!)
-What are those? Good heavens man! Cant you see theyre French loaves? (but (it is) French loaves (that-are) those)

There is also a form of address with the soft mutation of b > f
fachan Compare fechgyn! (= boys, lads), ferch! (= girl)
and also with the loss of this intial [v]
achan Compare ab, ap (son, in patronymics) < mab (= son)
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bara
[ba-ra] masculine noun
Gwentian:
bara
MEANING: bread.
______________________________________________
basa fawr na...
See: buasai fawr na (I wish that, if only...)
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blac-pat [blak-pat]
Gwentian:
blac-pat
Masculine noun. Plural = blac-pats
MEANING: cockroach.
From an English expression black + ??
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bopa
See: modrb
______________________________________________
Br-
Contraction of aber (confluence) in the colloquial forms of certain place names:
Aberaman > Braman
Aberogwr > Brcwr
See also Byr- (Byr-dr, etc)
______________________________________________
Braman
See: Aberaman (place name)
______________________________________________
bratu
See: afradu (to waste)
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brith [briith] adjective
Gwentian:
brith
MEANING:
(1) speckled
(2) (bread) speckled with currants; bara brith (bara brith) = currant bread
(3) (person) shady, dubious, unsavoury, not to be trusted; bachan brith = shady type
______________________________________________

Brocwr
See: Aberogwr (place name)
______________________________________________

buasai fawr na
[bi-a-sa vaur na] (phrase)
Gwentian:
basa fawr na... [ba-sa vaur na]
MEANING: I wish that, if only
Basa fawr na nelach chi rwpath i elpu = I wish youd do something to help
(Buasai fawr na wnelech chwi rywbeth i helpu)
(Source: Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, tudalen 2830)
______________________________________________

Byr-
br < ber- < aber
Byr-dr
< Aber-dr
See also: Br- (Brocwr < Aberogwr, etc)
______________________________________________

cl
See: cael
(to get)
______________________________________________
cael = to get.
(verb)
Gwentian:
cl [kl]
(1) In the south, ae [i] in a monosyllable becomes a long vowel aa [aa].
Cael > caal.
(This pronunciation is usually indicated by the spelling cl or cal, but we use caal)
In the south-east, aa >

______________________________________________

camsynad
See: camsynied
(to be mistaken)
______________________________________________
camsynied [kam-sn-yed] verb
Gwentian: camsynad [kam-s-nad]
MEANING: be mistaken
NOTES: (1) typical of the south is the loss of the consonantal i at the beginning of a final syllable
(2) In the south-east, a final e > a.
os nag w in camsynad ( os nad wf yn camsynied) = if Im not mistaken

______________________________________________
can [kan] masculine noun
Gwentian:
can

MEANING: flour

NOTES: Can is the southern word for flour, standard blawd.
Connected with the word cannaid = white, gleaming white.
By Merthrtudful there is a stream name Cannaid, and a village Abercannaid.
Latin candidus has the same root - as in English candid = frank, candidate (in Latin, someone dressed in a white gown).

Blawd (= flour) is related to blodeun / blodn (= flower), just as in English flour and flower are in fact one and the same word, albeit with different spellings.

In Catalan, the best part of the flour, top-quality flour is la flor de la farina, and in French fleur de farine, which probably explains how of blawd- (= flower) in Welsh and flower in English developed this new meaning: flower > the best part of the powder of milled grain > the powder of milled grain in general.

In the south-west of
Wales fflw^r is used - from the Middle English pronunciation of flour - fluur.
______________________________________________
carc
Masculine noun; a south-eastern word
MEANING: care, caution. The standard word is gofal.
NOTES: From an old English word cark (= care), from
Norman, from Latin CARCRE < CARRICRE (= load, take charge of).
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casglu
[kas-gli] verb
Gwentian:
clasgu [klas-gi] (also spelt clasgi, clasci)
MEANING: collect
NOTES: The form clasgu shows metathesis.
See 0926e Nodweddion y Wenhwseg / Features of Gwentian

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cerad
verb
MEANING: to walk
Standard Welsh: cerdded
______________________________________________
cerdded
[ker-dhed] verb
Gwentian:
cerad [ke-rad]
MEANING: to walk
NOTES: The southern form of cerdded is cered (as in south-west
Wales); in the south east, final e > a, hence cered > cerad

 

_______________________________________________
chwarae = to play.
Gwentian: wara [w-ra]
(1) In the south, chw is reduced to hw, and in the south-east, the h disappears
(2) A final ae [ai] is colloquially e. Along a broad south-west to north-east axis, it remains as e, but in the south-east, a final e > a.
wara teg, achan! (chwarae teg) = fair play, my friend!

______________________________________________

chwimio verb
MEANING: to move. In the North it is chwimiad. In the South the basic form is chwimlo, with an intrusive l. Colloquially it is as hwimled in the South-west, and as
wimlid [wim-lid] in Gwentian. The standard word is meaning to move is symud.

______________________________________________
clasci >
clasgu
See: casglu
______________________________________________
clasgu
See: casglu
(to collect)
______________________________________________
cnel
Masculine noun; a south-eastern word
MEANING: Canal. Standard Welsh camlas.
A reduction of canl, from Middle English canel (= channel), from a French form with initial c- (Francien, the dialect which is the basis of standard French, has initial ch- where other dialects have initial c-); ultimately from Latin canlis (= pipe, groove).


ar bont y cnel
on the canal bridge
______________________________________________
cd (spelt in this dictionary as
cood )
See: coed
______________________________________________
cod (spelt in this dictionary as
cood )
See: coed
______________________________________________
coed

Gwentian: cood, cod, cd [kood]
MEANING: wood (group of trees).
In the south, oe [i] in a monosyllable becomes a long vowel oo [oo], as in standard Welsh tn, Ynys Mn, etc
(This pronunciation is usually indicated by the spelling cd or cod, but we use cood)
Common in place names in the south Pen-coed >
Pen-cood, a village by Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr
______________________________________________
coino arian
MEANING: to make a mint, to make a lot of money, to coin it

______________________________________________
cood
See: coed

______________________________________________
crotn
[kro-tin] Masculine noun. Plural = crots [krots]
MEANING: lad
pan oon in grotn when I was a lad
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cwblhu verb
Gwentian:
cwpla [ku-pla]
MEANING: to finish.
NOTES: This is not the typical devoicing of this dialect (an initial b in the final becomes p) - but rather the effect of the initial h- in the suffix for forming verbs -hau (Cwbl-hu > cwpl-u).
In some words this stressed -au has been replaced by unstressed -a, and the stress has gone back onto the verb -
cwbl > cwbl-hau > cwpl-u > cwpla
cof > cof-hu > coff-u > coffa
______________________________________________
cwmws
See: cymws (straight)
______________________________________________
cwni = cwnni
See: cychwynnu
______________________________________________
cwnnu
See: cychwynnu (to raise)
______________________________________________

cwpla
See: cwblhu (to finish)
______________________________________________
cwt [kut]
feminine noun; a south-eastern word
MEANING: (1) tail (2) queue. The standard word for tail is cynffon
In the North, tail = cynffon, and queue = ciw
cwt y gth = the cats tail, (the) tail (of) the cat;
cwt y ci = the dogs tail, (the) tail (of) the dog;
aros yn y gwt = to wait in the queue.
______________________________________________

cychwynnu [kkh-w-ni] verb
Gwentian: cwnnu [ku-ni]
MEANING: (vi) to get up, to rise, (vt) to raise, to pick up. In standard Welsh, cychwynnu is not in use; the form of the word is cychwn = to begin.
NOTES: Cwnnu (often spelt cwnni, since in the south u and i are pronounced the same), is from an original cychwynnu, a variant of cychwn = to begin. Standard Welsh uses codi = to rise, get up. Sometimes spelt with an unetymological single n (cwni).
Cwnn lan "Get up".
______________________________________________
cymws [k-muis] adjective
Gwentian: cwmws [ku-mus]
MEANING: straight
NOTES: Final -w is usually reduced to w in Southern Welsh (Afon Ebw > Afon Ebw). This w has influenced the y in the first syllable.
yn gwmws = exactly;
mor gwmws r sth (mor gymws r saeth) As straight as an arrow.

 


______________________________________________
ddi
[dhi] Pronoun, third-person singular feminine
MEANING: she, her


ati ddi (= ati hi) to her

 

______________________________________________
deall [d-alh] verb
Gwentian: diall [d-alh]
MEANING: to understand
NOTES: In fact, diall is common in colloquial Welsh throughout
Wales


Ffiilu diall beth yw reina w i (ffaelu deall beth yw y rheina yr wyf) I cant work out what those things there are
______________________________________________

dera
verb.
MEANING: (second person singular imperative) 1come! 2 bring (something)
______________________________________________

diall
See: deall
(to understand)
______________________________________________

diarth
See: dieithr (strange)
______________________________________________
dieithr [di-eithr] adjective
Gwentian: diarth [d-arth]
MEANING: strange
(1) Colloquially there has been metathesis and a simplification of the diphthong [ei > i] to give dierth.
(2) In the south-east, a final e > a.
______________________________________________
dinon > dynion (men)
______________________________________________
drll (m) dryllau
Gwentian: drll, drylla
MEANING: piece; gun
______________________________________________
dwbler (m) dwbleri
Gwentian: dwplar, dwpleri
MEANING: platter
Middle English dobler (= doubler)
GPC: p1104 Ar lafar ym Morgannwg yn y ffurfiau dwpler, dwplar (fawr), lluosog dwpleri.
= In Glamorgan Welsh with the forms dwpler, dwplar (fawr), plural dwpleri.
See Nin Dou page 54 0928k
______________________________________________
dweud
[dweid] verb.
Gwentian: gweud

MEANING: to say.
NOTES:
Gweud is the southern form (northern form deud).
gwetoch chi fynnoch chi (dywedoch chi a fynnoch chi) say what you like (you may say that which you may wish)
gwetws a (dywedodd e) he said
______________________________________________
dynion
Gwentian: dinon
masculine noun, plural.

MEANING: men; people
NOTES: (1) In the south-east, in certain words the obscure vowel y > i in the penult.
(2) typical of the south is the loss of the consonantal i at the beginning of a final syllable
ion > -on

______________________________________________
dysgu i gi bach gachu
Gwentian: dysgu / disgu i gi bch gachu
MEANING: teach your grandmother to suck eggs, be presumptious enough to think you know more than somebody with a lot of experience. Literally: teach a puppy dog to shit
SOURCE: Geiriadur Yr Acdemi Gymreig
______________________________________________
eisiau
[is-ye] Masculine noun.
Gwentian: iisha [-sha]
MEANING: need, necessity
NOTE: (1) In the South, a penult diphthong ei becomes half-long vowel i (*isie)
(2) In the South, an s in before i becomes sh. Hence South-western iishe [i-she]
(3) A final au [ai] is colloquially e. Along a broad south-west to north-east axis, it remains as e, but in the south-east, a final e > a.

______________________________________________
esgid
[es-gid] Feminine noun. Plural = esgidiau [es-gid-ye]
Gwentian: esgid, sgitsha [es-gid, ski-cha]
MEANING: shoe
NOTES: (1) The loss of a first syllable is a common phenomenon in spoken Welsh. Here, the e- drops away esgidiau > sgidiau.
(2) In the south an [y-] at the beginning of the final syllable drops away, and the plural suffix -iau becomes -e, and in the south east a.
However, this is not exactly the case here - the -i is present, and causes the palatalisation of the preceding -d, so we have (d+y) > (j), with devoicing > (ch)
The only other word showing this development is cydio yn rhwbeth (= get hold of something) which becomes citsho yn rwpath
______________________________________________
esgidiau Plural of esgid (shoe)
______________________________________________

ffenast
See: ffenestr
(window)
______________________________________________
ffenestr
[fe-nestr] Feminine noun. Plural = ffenestri [fe-nes-tri]
Gwentian: ffenast [fe-nast], ffenestri
MEANING: window
NOTES: (1) The loss of a the final r (after t, d, th) is a common colloquial Welsh feature ffenestr > ffenest. Other examples are
cebstr (= halter for a horse) > cebst,
aradr (= plough) >
arad
(2) In the south-east, a final e > a.
______________________________________________
ffritwn
feminine noun. Plural = ffritwns
MEANING: fritter
NOTES: Source: Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru
______________________________________________
gwd = gwd
See: gwaed(= blood)
______________________________________________
gwad = gwd
See: gwaed(= blood)
______________________________________________

gwaith
Gwentian: gwaith [gwaith]
MEANING: work.
______________________________________________
gwasgodi [gwas-g-di] verb
South-eastern form: gwashgoti [gwash- go-ti] or gwishgoti [gwish-go-ti].
MEANING: (1) to shelter, (2) to shade, to put in shadow
NOTES: (1) In the South d at the beginning of the final syllable becomes t,
(2) s
becomes sh in the vicinity of i but sometimes in other environments
Source: Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, page1596

______________________________________________
gwashgoti
See: gwasgodi (to shelter, to shade)
______________________________________________
gweithio [gweith-yo] verb
Gwentian:
gwiitho [gw-tho]
MEANING: to work
NOTES: In the South
(1) ei in the penult > [ii],
(2) initial [y] in a final syllable is lost
______________________________________________
gwiitho

See: gweithio (to work)
______________________________________________
Y Gwila

See: Y Gwliau (Christmastime)
______________________________________________
gwishgoti

See: gwasgodi (to shelter, to shade)
______________________________________________

gwitho gwiitho
See: gweithio
______________________________________________
Y Gwliau [ guil-ye] feminine noun (plural)
Gwentian:
Y Gwila [gwii-la]
MEANING: Christmastime
NOTES: (1) The diphthong w [ui] has become consonant + vowel [wi-]
(compare the southern form of w [ui] = egg, which is wi [wii]).
(2) The i- at the beginning of the final syllable is dropped (a usual feature of the south).
(3) The plural ending -au is -a (a typical south-eastern feature).
In Catalan, this concept of Christmas time is the same. The Christmas period is called Les Festes (the feast-days, the twelve days of Christmas, the twelve days after Christmas Day - December 26 27 28 29 30 31; January 1 2 3 4 5 6).

______________________________________
h
1 In the south-east the h is usually absent. This characterisitic was carried over into the English of the south-east.

2 In general, the existence of the h is remembered, and it reappears in cases of emphasis in the colloquial register, or when a speaker uses a more formal register of Welsh (though for some speakers there is a tendency to hypercorrect, and place an h where it is not required - a trait also of the English of some speakers in the south-east - an **eavy piece of hiron

In this dictionary, we include the h, but write it as a superscript letter - hala (= to send)

______________________________________________________
hala verb
Gwentian: h
ala (the superscript h indicates a dropped h; in the south-east the h is usually absent)
MEANING: to send
NOTES:
______________________________________________
honna [ho-na] pronoun (feminine)
Gwentian: honna [o-na]
MEANING: that there, that thing there, that person there
______________________________________________
hwnna [hu-na] pronoun (masculine)
Gwentian: hwnna [u-na]
MEANING: that there, that thing there, that person there
______________________________________________

i chi
See: yr ch chi
(you see)
______________________________________________
iisha

See: eisiau (need, necessity)
______________________________________________
i maes [i mis] adverb
Gwentian: ms
MEANING: outside (location) = on the outside; outside (movement) = to the outside
NOTES: In south-west Wales in monosyllables ae [i] becomes aa [aa].
I maes becomes maas. (The preposition i is dropped)
In the south-east aa [aa] > []. So maes > maas > ms.
______________________________________________

isha iisha
See: eisiau
______________________________________________
jac
Masculine noun. Plural: jacs
MEANING: (in nicknames for inhabitants of certain places).
Abi Jacs = inhabitants of Mynachlog-nedd (from English Abbey Jacks - Mynachlog-nedd is called Neath Abbey by the English)
NOTES:
Yr Abi Jacs ar Mera brid
Doos dim ou bth nw yn y bd

the Abbey Jacks and the Mera breed (people from a part of Castell-nedd),
theres nobody like them (theres nothing of their sort) in the world"
Source: Tafodieithoedd Morgannwg / T. Jones, Ysgol y Cyngor, Dunraven, Treherbert / Y Grail, Volume 4, No. 13 (1911)

Jacs Byrtwa - Swansea Jacks
______________________________________________
llon llafur
[lhon LLAA vir] Masculine noun. Plural = llonna llafur [LHO na LLAA vir] (= llonnau llafur)
MEANING: Gwentian word for poppy ((the) merry (flower) (of the) corn)
SOURCE: GPC
______________________________________________

ms
See: i maes (outside)
______________________________________________
ms maas
See: i maes
______________________________________________
mas maas
See: i maes
______________________________________________
nawr

See: yn awr (now)
______________________________________________

nid
= not.
Gwentian: nid
______________________________________________
Llanfable [han-va-ble]
feminine noun
South-eastern form: Probably Llanfapla [lhan-va-pla]
MEANING: village name
NOTES: This village is in Llan-arth Fawr parish, Sir Fynw. The local form would be Llanfapla
(1) the final e becomes a;
(2) and the [b] at the beginning of the final syllable becomes devoiced to [p].
The English form of the name is Llanvapley which shows the b / p dialect feature.
(The English form is in fact the Welsh name showing the influence of a local pronunciation and interference from English spelling conventions)
(Confirmation of the local form?)
______________________________________________
*Llanfapla? > Llanfable (village name)
______________________________________________
membar
See: membr (= member)
______________________________________________
membr, membrau
[MEM ber, MEM brai] m
Gwentian: membar, membra [MEM bar, MEM bra]

This Anglicism is not found in standard Welsh, though sporadic examples of it are found in earlier periods.
ETYMOLOGY: English member

See Nin Dou page 99 0928k

_____________________________________________
mintan [min -tan] verb
1
(
South-east Wales) argue
Pw fintan ch gilydd chi? What are you arguing about? (What arguing with your fellow are you?)
ETYMOLOGY: probably from English maintain
______________________________________________
mis, misoedd
[
MIIIS, MI sodh] m
Gwentian: mish, mishodd [
MIIISH, MI shodh]


mor hir mish pump (South Wales) said of a long wait as long as a month of five (Saturdays) The last Saturday of the month was a payday, when the months wages were paid; but some months have five Saturdays if the first Saturday falls on the first, second or third day of the month
(mor = as) + (hir = long) + ( = as) + (mish, southern form of mis = month) + (pump = five)
______________________________________________
mish
See: mis (= month)
______________________________________________
modrb
feminine noun
MEANING: aunt
In the south east the childs word for an aunt is bopa,
evidently a form of modrb
(1) probably reduced to mb,
(2) with the addition of a diminutive -a; (moba).
(3) In Welsh initial b and m can interchange (boba).
(4) In the south-east, a b- at the beginning of a final syllable is devoiced to p- (bopa).

 

______________________________________________
nenor...
See: yn enwr... (in oaths)
______________________________________________
nid oes dim [nid is dim] verb.
Gwentian: doos dim [doos dim], sdim [stim]
MEANING: there isnt
NOTES: (1) The first syllable, which is unstressed, drops away in colloquial Welsh > does dim. Since in the South oes > oos that is, the siphthong [i] in a monosyllable generally becomes a long vowel [oo] we have doos dim.
(2) There can be a further reduction with the loss of the second syllable, also unstressed.
doos dim > sdim
sdim iisha i ti lefan felna, bachan!
(nid oes [dim] eisiau i ti lefain fel yna, bachan!)
theres no need for you to cry like that, my lad!
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Ocwr
See: Ogwr (river name)
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Ogwr feminine noun.
Gwentian:
Ocwr
MEANING: (river name)
NOTES: In the south-east b, d, g at the beginning of a final syllable are devoiced to p, t, c,
(1) The village at the estuary of the river Ogwr is Aberogwr (called by the English Ogmore on Sea). In Gwentian Brocwr < Berocwr < Aberocwr < Aberogwr.
Pen-y-bont ar Ogwr (Bridgend) is Pen-y-bont ar Ocwr or Pen-bont ar Ocwr, Pem-bont ar Ocwr (though the tag ar Ocwr would not be used generally)
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ol reit = all right.
ol reit

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onna / honna
See: honna (that there, that thing there, that person there) ______________________________________________
onno / honno
See: honno (she - the female or the object of feminine gender mentioned but not present)
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ots
Gwentian: ots
1 difference

2 (According to Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru p2660, in Ceredigion and South Wales yn ots = different.

Wetws e ddim byd yn ots wrthi
He didnt say anything different to her, He said the same thing to her

bod yn ots i bawb be different to everybody else, have a contrary opinion to everybody else

3 (According to Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru p2660, in Morgannwg yn ots o = remarkably, extraordinarily.

Mar bachan co yn ots o gryf
That fellow over theres tremendously strong

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padell
feminine noun. Plural padelli [p-delh, pa-d-lhi]
Gwentian: patall, padelli [p-talh, pa-d-lhi]
MEANING: pan; knee cap

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patall
See: padell (pan)
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pen y glec [ pen glek]
MEANING: ("top (of) the chat") a place (bridge, street corner, etc) where people come together to chat after work or after a chapel service
NOTES: (Source: GPC)
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pryfeta verb.
Gwentian: (same as standard form) pryfeta
MEANING: hunt hares
NOTES: (pryfed = hares) + (-a, suffix to form a verb indicating hunting, collecting, gathering together).

In the South prf no longer exists in the sense of hare, but in the north-west, prf mawr is still a name for the hare.

Prf (or pryfn), plural pryfed (also pryfetach) is nowadays insect.
(Source: GYA)


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prysur [pr sir]
MEANING: busy

o brysur indeed, really, seriously, in truth

NOTES: GPC 2925: Ar lafar yn y De. Odi, o brysur, mar peth **win wed yn wir

(= yes, honestly / really, what Im saying is true)


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pw [pui] preposition
Gwentian: (same as standard form) pw
MEANING: who


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rgilar [RE gi lar] adjective.
MEANING: regular


yn rgilar (adverb) regularly

NOTE: Does not occur in standard Welsh.

ORIGIN: English regular.


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rong adjective
Gwentian: (same as general form) rong
MEANING: wrong. This Englishism is common in colloquial Welsh all over Wales. The standard forms are anghywir = incorrect, oi le = out if its place


ma un o nw yn rong (mae un ohonynt hwy yn rong) = one of them is wrong


yn y lle rong = in the wrong place
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sth

See: saeth (arrow)
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saeth feminine noun. Plural = saethau
Gwentian: sth, siitha
MEANING: arrow
NOTES:
(1) In the South ae [i] > aa [aa] in monosyllables.
(2) In the south-east aa [aa] > [].
Hence saeth > saath > sth
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sth = sth
See: saeth(= arrow)
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sath = sth
See: saeth(= arrow)
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scitsha = sgitsha
From esgidiau (= shoes). See esgid(= shoe)
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sdim >
See: nid oes dim (there isnt)
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sgitsha
See: esgidiau (shoes)
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sgrego / sgregan [sgre go, sgre gan] verb
Not found in standard Welsh.
MEANING: to strangle, wring the neck of (e.g. a hen)

ORIGIN: From an English dialect word to scrag (= to strangle).

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shimplo [shim-plo] verb
MEANING: belittle, speak slightingly of

Not in use in standard Welsh; the standard form would be simplio, and is thus found in dictionaries (as in GPC - Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru)

See Nin Dou page 57 0928k

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shoto [sho-to] verb
MEANING: to throw; to throw away

Not in use in standard Welsh; the standard form would be siotio, and is thus found in GPC - (Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru)

Dialect English to shot (= to throw)

See Nin Dou page 55 0928k
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siitha
See: saethau (arrows)

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slimyn (m) [sli-min], slimen (f) [sli-men]
MEANING: slim man, slim woman

Not in use in standard Welsh.

slimyn is sometimes found spelt slimin.

slimyn main skinny man ([a] thin slim-one)

slimen o fenyw skinny woman ([a] slim-one [of ] [a] woman)

See Nin Dou page 57 0928k

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sylcan [sl-kan] verb
MEANING: to sulk. From English to sulk.

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teg
= fair.
Gwentian: (same as standard form) teg [teeg]
wara teg, achan! (chwarae teg, fachan) fair play, my friend!
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torth [torth] Plural: torthau [tor-the], feminine noun.
Gwentian: (same as standard form) torth; but plural is tortha [tor-tha]
MEANING: loaf

NOTE:
A typical south-eastern feature is final au in a final syllable > a. Hence the plural form torthau
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traws [traus] Adjective.
Gwentian: (same as standard form) traws
1 harsh
gira traws (= geiriau traws) harsh words
2 peevish, cross, easily annoyed, quick to anger

(Source: Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, tudalen 3561)
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wara
See: chwarae
(= to play)

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w i
See: yr wf fi (= I am)
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wimlid
See: chwimio (= to move)
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wnna / hwnna
See: hwnna (= that there, that thing there, that person there)
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wnnw / hwnnw
See: hwnnw (he - the male or the object of masculine gender mentioned but not present) ______________________________________________
y
1 reduced form of a vowel in a tonic syllable

stymog < stumog (= stomach)

2 reduced form of a vowel in a pretonic syllable

cyffyla < ceffylau (= horses)

 

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yn awr [n aur] adverb
Gwentian: nawr [naur]

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yn enwr... [n e-nur...]
Gwentian: nenor [ne-nor...]

MEANING: (in oaths) in the name of...


Nenor annwl! (yn enwr annwl) Good God! (in the name of the dear one)
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yr wf fi [r ui vii] verb
Gwentian: w i [u ii]


MEANING: I am, that-I-am
-Pw wt ti? Isaac Lewis w i, syr (Isaac Lewis yr wf, syr)
-Who are you? Im Isaac Lewis, sir ((it is) Isaac Lewis that-I-am, sir)
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yr ch chi [r ii khii] verb
Gwentian: i chi [ii khii]
MEANING: you are, that-you-are
i chin gweld (yr ch chin gweld) = you see
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ys conjunction
Standard Welsh: fel

MEANING: as
mae pob dicn bach yn (h)elp, ys gwetws y dryw bach wrth bisho yn y mr

every little bit helps, as the wren said as he pissed in the sea

ORIGIN: Probably the English conjunction as [az, z]

Adolygiad diweddaraf - latest update 07 07 2002
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